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Birth name: Louise Pay, Nickname: dog listener, Country: United States of America, Phone: 925-487-9386, E-mail: louise (at) ebdoglistener.com, Language: English
I offer: Dog Listener CA Louise Pay trained by Jan Fennell The Dog Listener. Canine advocate. Puppy Listener. San Francisco Bay. Bay area Dog Trainer. Dog Behaviorist. Puppy training. Dog training any behavior-any breed and any age. The dog listener California, Rescue dogs, dog behavior advice, dog problems, potty training, walking issues, bad dog behavior, dog behaviorist bay area CA, dog aggression, dog biting, dog chewing, fearful dog, shy dogs, dog feeding issues, dogs & Children, San Francisco Bay Area dog training, Dogs in California, crate training, dog issues, dog problems, helping rescues, helping dogs, dog behaviorist, the book the dog listener by Jan fennell, Dog Listener San Francisco East Bay, The Dog Listener CA, Face Book Louise ebdoglistener.com, dog advice, dog help, dog tips, Dog Listener worldwide, find Dog Listener California. Helping dogs in foster care, shelters. San Francisco-Berkeley-to-San Jose. In home work shops for fosters and adopters in the east bay Dog advice help
Louise Pay @ East Bay Dog Listener,  San Francisco Bay Area CA

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53 results for Louise Pay

Coyotes, how to kep your pet dog and the Coyetes safe!

Coyotes are a common wildlife species throughout North America. The coyote (Canis latrans) is a member of the dog family and has adapted well our urban landscapes and appears to be equally comfortable living in city suburbs as they do out in the wilderness. They have a home range territory of about 20 square kilometers (8 square miles) and can be spotted anytime of the day but are most active at night when they go in search for food. Coyotes prey on deer and livestock but will also scavenge on dead animals and eat insects, rodents, rabbits and small birds. In urban areas, coyotes will take advantage of unsecured garbage or pet food if these attractants are left outside. They are also known to kill or injure pets, especially small dogs or cats when they enter populated areas. It is the adaptable quality of these predators that often leads to conflict with humans.Coyotes breed annually during winter months, between January and March and are more active during these months, as they scour for food in preparation for their litter. Mated pairs can remain together for up to 12 years, and on average, six pups are born in April or May. Litter size depends on population density and available food sources during the breeding season. Wild coyotes are naturally curious, however they are timid and will usually run away if challenged. Coyotes start posing a risk to people when they lose their timidness and become comfortable around humans which is usually a result of direct or indirect feeding by humans. A few precautions and good, old-fashioned common sense will help minimize conflicts and encounters with coyotes in your area. Prevent Coyotes From Getting Comfortable in Your NeighborHoodPeople in residential neighbourhoods need to work together to ensure that coyotes don't start to feel comfortable living in their neighbourhood. Coyotes that are rewarded through direct or indirect feeding will eventually loose their fear of humans and begin to see humans, their yards and their pets as food sources. A coyote that is comfortable in one person's yard is going to feel comfortable in everyone's yard. So become proactive in your community by helping to educate neighbors and residents about coyotes. Do not feed coyotes or any other wildlife, especially near human habitation. Coyotes can be discouraged from hanging around homes by scaring them off each time they are seen and by removing attractants. Keep all garbage in plastic or metal containers with lids tightly secured. Bring pet food inside a secure location every night or, better yet, feed your pet indoors. If you have a compost be sure the bin is securely built and has a lockable lid. Remove any meat, meat-by-products, fish and cooked fruit and vegetables from compost. Adding lime will help reduce odor and aid the composting process. If you have fruit trees be sure to pick the fruit as it ripens and do not leave fruit to rot on the ground. If a coyote becomes a pest report it to your local animal control. Coyotes can also be removed by a homeowner in defense of private property or to protect personal safety on land that they own. But DO NOT leave poison out under any circumstance. You can harm other wild animals and domestic animals in your neighborhood. Coyotes can be humanely trapped, so you consider hiring a licensed trapper if the animal becomes a real nuisance. But in the majority of circumstances it's best to alert authorities who can deal with the situation. Keeping your Dog Safe Coyotes pose very little risk to large dogs, unless there is a pack of coyotes involved. Usually small dogs are targeted, so they should be monitored more closely if there are coyotes in the area. Keep dogs inside at night and under close supervision while they are outside during the day. Don't let your dog out into a backyard unattended. If you own a small dog keep the dog on a short leash. Avoid extension leashes. That way if there is any trouble, or you spot a coyote, you can quickly pick the dog up for protection. Supervise the dog when it is off-leash. Keep the dog in front or beside you while walking, not behind you. Avoid walking by abandoned or neglected properties and bushy areas, especially at dusk and dawn. If your pet gets injured or killed by a coyote be sure to report it to local authorities. If you see a coyote be sure to report the sighting to local authorities, and don't forget to post up a NeighborHound Alert for your fellow dog owners! If You Encounter a Coyote Most coyotes will keep to themselves. But on occasion a coyote may demonstrate no fear of humans. However, keep in mind it is not normal for coyotes to attack or pursue humans, especially adults. If it does display such aggression, it is most likely sick. If you spot a coyote stop, remain calm and assess your situation. Never approach or crowd a coyote — give it an escape route. If the coyote seems unaware of you, move away quietly when it is not looking in your direction. If the coyote is aware of you, let it know you are human: shout at it, wave your arms above your head to make yourself appear more threatening, throw stones or other objects at it. If you have a small child or dog, pick them up. If a coyote approaches you make yourself look as large as possible. (So if sitting, stand for example.) Wave your arms and throw objects at the coyote. Use a deterrent. Deterrents could include: rocks, sticks, banging pots and pans, tin cans filled will rocks. Shout at the coyote in a loud aggressive voice. If the coyote continues to approach do not turn away or run — this may encourage the coyote to chase you. Continue to exaggerate the above gestures and slowly move to safety or move towards buildings or human activity. If the coyote attacks you — Fight Back! Dogs Used as Coyote Deterrants Some dog breeds are effective in helping to scare off coyotes and have been used by farmers and ranchers to guard livestock. For example: Great Pyrenees, Komondor, Anatolian Shepherd and Akbash Dogs. Greyhound packs are also highly effective in tracking and hunting coyotes. If You Suspect a Coyote is Sick Coyotes suffer from diseases often found in domestic dogs such as canine distemper, rabies, canine hepatitis, canine influenza, and parvovirus. They are also susceptible to sarcoptic mange, These diseases and parasites can be transferred to dogs and cats coming into contact with an area where an infected coyote may have lived or sought shelter (e.g. a farm's straw bedding, hay bales, etc.). Other common parasites which can affect humans or pets include heartworm, hookworm, and tapeworms. Therefore, if you find a sick or dead coyote or its scat (droppings), never pick it up! Report any sick or dead coyote to your local animal authority. Also be sure that your dog has all its current vaccinations, to protect your pet from potentially picking up an illness from a wild animal.  
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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yasni 2012-01-09  +  

The importance of a rescue group doing a home visit, before adopting a dog out

The importance of a rescue group doing a home visit, before adopting a dog. Adopting a dog is a big deal, you are saving a life, thank you! The importance of the rescue group doing a home visit, prior to your bringing your friend home can not be overstated. Both you and your new friend need to have the right life time partner. The right person doing the evaluation, is just as important as having one! The foster family/foster coordinator needs to be the one accessing the home/someone who knows the dog's history well. Not a total stranger. A good group will send someone to your home, not to look at your decor, but to see how you live, your life style, knowing the personality of the dog in their care, they will know if this is a good fit. Being in love with a dog is not enough, you need to make sure that both of you/all of you will be happy. This relationship is life long. This is not just about your home/yard/ being a safe place, but are you the right person/family for this dog? Dogs are for a life time, they are loving amazing creatures and bringing the wrong one home will be awful for you, your family and the dog. Please be grateful to a group who cares enough to check your home/life/activity level, before your new friend comes home. Some groups do not do this, they do not know the dogs in their care, their personality, needs, likes etc. With time, care, finding the right home will save all those involved from failing, and being broken hearted! One of the best ways to adopt, is to foster first, take your relationship slowly! Take time to find the right companion, for all of your sakes. Be grateful to a group for taking the time to find the right home. Again, thank you for adopting. Every dog's personality is different and even if you have had this breed before, does not mean that you have had this personality! A good rescue/organization will get to know you and your family, and will let you know if the dog you love, is a good fit for your family. The best person to do the home/yard check is the foster, as they know the dog best. Louise Dog Listener Bay Area CA. Louise Pay The East Bay Dog Listener Louise Pay, The East Bay Dog Listener, Dog Behavior Advice & Help, Cell: +1.925.487.9386. Gentle, kind, canine communication, amichien® bonding understand your dog & then shape the right behavior. Trained by Jan Fennell International Dog Listener, Dog Behavior Specialist, Certified Bonded Adopting a dog is a big deal, you are saving a life, thank you! The importance of the rescue group doing a home visit, prior to your bringing your friend home can not be overstated. Both you and your new friend need to have the right life time partner. The right person doing the evaluation, is just as important as having one! The foster family/foster coordinator needs to be the one accessing the home/someone who knows the dog's history well. Not a total stranger. A good group will send someone to your home, not to look at your decor, but to see how you live, your life style, knowing the personality of the dog in their care, they will know if this is a good fit. Being in love with a dog is not enough, you need to make sure that both of you/all of you will be happy. This relationship is life long. This is not just about your home/yard/ being a safe place, but are you the right person/family for this dog? Dogs are for a life time, they are loving amazing creatures and bringing the wrong one home will be awful for you, your family and the dog. Please be grateful to a group who cares enough to check your home/life/activity level, before your new friend comes home. Some groups do not do this, they do not know the dogs in their care, their personality, needs, likes etc. With time, care, finding the right home will save all those involved from failing, and being broken hearted! One of the best ways to adopt, is to foster first, take your relationship slowly! Take time to find the right companion, for all of your sakes. Be grateful to a group for taking the time to find the right home. Again, thank you for adopting. Every dog's personality is different and even if you have had this breed before, does not mean that you have had this personality! A good rescue/organization will get to know you and your family, and will let you know if the dog you love, is a good fit for your family. The best person to do the home/yard check is the foster, as they know the dog best. Louise Pay, The East Bay Dog Listener, Dog Behavior Advice & Help, Cell: +1.925.487.9386.
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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yasni 2011-11-07  +  

Helping rescue groups at no cost east bay area. before & after adoption.

Louise helps adopted dogs when referred by the rescue group, without charging the adopters. Working to keep dogs out of shelters & help them settle in their new homes. Pre-adoption counseling is available, when the rescue asks.
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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yasni 2011-03-14  +  

Bill Bruce & pet ownership.

Displaying the only post.Dog Listener Bay Area CA The Calgary Model The animal control bylaw in Calgary, Alberta, Canada has been hailed by many as a HUGE success. While other cities and provinces in Canada are banning breeds, Calgary is choosing education program and stronger enforcement. What's the end result? By all accounts, reports and statistics, the bylaw is working! Not only that, the bylaw works so well and the results are so highly praised, Calgary is inspiring animal control officials outside of Canada to use the bylaw as a model for their own animal control ordinances. The following is written by Dana Grove: The bylaw officers in Calgary have taken a stand against breed banning, and responded to dog bite concerns with a tougher licensing program and stronger enforcement. The City of Calgary also spends considerable funds on dog safety public awareness and education campaigns. Research shows that just 1 hour of dog safety training in grades 2 and 3 can reduce these attacks by 80%. "We don't punish breeds, we punish behavior," said chief bylaw officer Bill Bruce. "The bottom line is, we believe all dogs are capable of biting." In Calgary, 90 per cent of dogs are licensed, allowing bylaw officers to keep track of pets and owners. The city also has a strict fine structure that includes a $250 penalty for chase incidents and $350 fines for bites. The bylaw also allows the officers to declare specific dogs as “dangerous” and this label brings with it higher license fees, muzzling rules and age restrictions on the dog's handlers. The bylaw states that a dog can only be destroyed by owner request or court order. The county of Newell in Alberta received dozens of letters and e-mails from around the world from people who oppose breed restrictions, said deputy Reeve Jack Harbinson. "We decided after listening to the people, they were right," he said. The success of their actions? Approximately 1000 reported dog bites in 1985 and 260 reported dog bites in 2003. Calgary’s dangerous dog legislation was implemented in response to the bite problem. Dangerous dog, not dangerous breed. The results speak for themselves – a 70% drop in the number of OVERALL dog bites. The measures Calgary has taken have shown results, and set a model and a precedent that should be implemented across Canada. THIS is the model Ontario should be looking at… http://www.bdnhumanesociety.com/calgary _solution.htm Calgary dog attacks fall to lowest level in 25 years City a leader in reducing canine problems, says top bylaw officer By Sean Myers, Calgary HeraldFebruary 21, 2009 Attacks by aggressive dogs are at the lowest level they've been in 25 years despite a steady population growth and the absence of breed-specific legislation brought in to tackle canine issues in other jurisdictions. Despite the low numbers, Calgary's top bylaw officer plans to delve deeper into the causes of dog attacks to try to bring the incidents even lower. "This is exactly what we've been targeting," said Bill Bruce. "Our ultimate goal, of course, is to get it to zero, or as close to that as possible." Bruce said Calgary is a leader in reducing dog attacks in Canada, noting that he often receives invitations from animal services around the world to talk about the work done here to reduce dog bites. Calgary bylaw officers recorded 340 reported aggressive dog incidents in 2008 which included chases, bites and damage to property. Of those, 145 complaints were bites. In 2007, 374 aggressive dog calls were made, including 137 bites, and in 2006, of 402 aggressive dog complaints, 199 were for bites. By comparison, back in 1985, the city received a whopping 1,938 aggressive dog complaints, including 621 bites, at a time when Calgary had a population of just over 600,000. A new pet owner bylaw was brought in three years ago that included stiffer fines and a recognition that aggressive behaviour in dogs is normally traced back to irresponsible owners. Bruce said both the heavier penalties -- ranging from $350 to $1,500, to euthanizing the dog--and the philosophy of blaming bad owners rather than pets has helped reduce incidents. This year, Bruce is launching a pilot project where he'll have six officers dedicated to following up every aggressive dog complaint to identify common factors in attacks that can be addressed in future bylaw enforcement and public education campaigns. "We want to look at everything that led up to an aggressive dog attack," said Bruce. "We're hoping to find four to six common things that people do that causes dogs to bite. Our goal is not to have anyone bitten by a dog." At the same time Bruce investigates softer approaches to addressing pet owner issues, he's also been given a bigger stick with which to penalize chronically non-compliant dog owners. In the fall, bylaw enforcement gained the right to tag a dog as a nuisance pet, which means doubling the fines on the owner. One dog has already received this designation, according to Bruce. Brandy Campbell-Biggs, president of Pit Bulls For Life, a non-profit animal rescue operation geared specifically toward pit bulls, said targeting bad owners instead of stigmatizing entire breeds is the key to reducing aggressive incidents. While dog bites have been going down, the number of pit bulls coming to the city has been increasing, she said. She doesn't know how many there are in the city, but her organization has placed 160 pit bulls in foster homes or with permanent adoptive owners in Calgary over the past three and a half years. Pit Bulls For Life brings the dogs in from jurisdictions with breed-specific legislation that sees many breeds deemed dangers, including pit bulls, targeted for euthanasia. She said 20 per cent of the dogs they help come from Ontario. "We have a lot more pit bulls in Calgary now," said Campbell-Briggs. "Part of the reason is we don't have breed-specific legislation. I'm proud to be a Calgarian because our animal by-law officers deal with specific incidents and don't deal with it as a breed issue. There's no bias and that's so important." Pit Bulls For Life doesn't take in any dogs with histories of aggression toward humans or other animals and says it works with the city bylaw department to educate owners. Canada Post has also noticed a slight reduction in dog incidents involving its letter carriers in Calgary that bucks the trend nationally. From January to August last year, 25 dog incidents were reported by carriers, two of which resulted in time off work. In the same time period in 2007, 28 incidents were reported, with three requiring time away from work. An aggressive dog can lead to an entire block losing mail service until the animal is brought under control. "We have to ensure the safety of our employees--your front step and front yard are our employees'workplace,"said Andrean Wolvers, Canada Post safety manager for Calgary. "We tell our employees when in doubt, get out." Wolvers says partnerships with the city and other organizations that send employees into residential neighbourhoods has helped reduce dog attacks on posties. "The city and Bill Bruce have been very proactive," said Wolvers. The Calgary Humane Society said the working relationship it has with the city is unique in Canada. "We have a very collaborative relation-ship. When we talk to other humane societies, they say we're the only ones they've heard of that have a positive working relationship with the city bylaw department," said Calgary Humane Society spokeswoman Lindsay Jones. "Other cities learn from us and the way we do things here." smyers@theherald.canwest.com htt p://www.calgaryherald.com/Life/Calgary+attack s+fall+lowest+level+years/1313555/story.html Sun, March 18, 2007 Attacks, aggressive dog incidents down UPDATED: 2007-03-18 14:32:23 MST Bylaw boss credits new rules, owner awareness By NADIA MOHARIB, SUN MEDIA The number of aggressive dog incidents in the city is down with officials crediting beefed up bylaws for the decline. The rate of aggression cases between dogs dropped by 56%, from 162 to 72 between 2005 and last year, bylaw boss Bill Bruce told the Sun. Biting incidents are also down by 21% to 199, he added. “It wasn’t all about cats,” he said referring to the city’s highly publicized introduction of a cat bylaw. “We did a lot to change our bylaws.” He said stiff fines for offences combined with increased education likely led to the good news. Owners can face fines of $350 if their dogs bite someone and $750 if that person needs medical attention. An attack can mean a fine of $1,500. Being blamed for a dog on dog attack sees an owner stuck with a $250 fine. “You, as a pet owner are 100 percent responsible,” Bruce said. “It’s not controlling pets, it’s about holding people responsible for their pets.” In the city of Calgary all cats and dogs three months of age and older must have a licence. The penalty for not licensing a cat or dog is $250.00. A animal licence enables Animal Services to return a missing cat or dog as soon as possible to an owner. According to the latest city census there are 92,563 dogs in Calgary up from 83,475 in 1998. The 2001 census showed there were about 90,000 cats, up by nearly 50% from the previous polling of Calgarians. http://calsun.canoe.ca/News/Alberta/2007/ 03/18/3776727.html
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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yasni 2011-02-17  +  

Amichien Bonding California

23 Nov 2008 ... Dog Listener Louise Pay. Positive Dog Training CA Amichien Bonding USA. ... Dog Listener California Louise Pay San Francisco East Bay Area ...
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webring.com 2011-02-08  +  

ebdoglistener.com website description

Dog Listener Bay Area CA Louise Pay 925-487-9386 kind dog Training get willing ... Dog Listener California Louise Pay.. Amichien Bonding..The Dog . ...
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websitedescription.com 2011-02-08  +  

Amichien Bonding California

Changing dogs lives, by educating dog owners & canine caregivers, about a gentle training method called Amichien Bonding. ... Louise Pay Amichien Dog Training Bay Area CA. ...
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webring.org 2011-02-08  +  

WebRing: Science, Biology, Animals, Mammals, Dogs

Louise Pay Amichien Dog Training Bay Area CA. Trained by Jan Fennell & Tony Knight in ... Dog Listener California Louise Pay San Francisco East Bay Area ...
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dir.webring.com 2011-02-08  +  

What's Dog Listening, by Tony Knight Dog Listener

What is Dog Listening? I know that some people do get confused about the difference between a Dog Listener, a dog whisperer and a dog trainer. So here it is in a nutshell… Dogs communicate all the time, both among themselves and to us. Most of the time, we are told that the dog must do as we say, without taking the time to think from the dog’s point of view. Even those who do, still insist that they must tow the line, or else they get pinned down, jabbed in the neck, jerked around, smacked or worse. Perhaps the easiest way to distinguish between our approaches to training is this Dog Listener - is based on understanding a dogs behaviour and uses positive, safe and easy to understand training methods to give your dog the right messages. Dog Whisperer - is also based on understanding a dog, but on TV uses training techniques we are repeatedly told 'not to use at home' because while Cesar can use them effectively, they are considered too dangerous for the average dog owner to use. Dog Trainer - may use a wide variety of dog training methods (so always make sure you're happy with their approach before using one). A Dog Listener knows how to read what a dog is trying to say, and more importantly how to give the right answers. A dog needs to know there is a leader, and we all know from experience that the best kind of leaders doesn’t need to use force (of course Hitler, Stalin, Saddam Hussein etc. got some success using force, but I think we all agree it’s not the best way). Instead, think of a Dog Listener as being the kind of leader you would trust. Some would say Nelson Mandela (or Mahatma Gandhi, as I was dubbed in a recent interview I did for another TV show) would be the right kind of role model. A dog will ask who the leader is in its language, so it is very useful to know that language, and “listen” to the conversation your dog is trying to have with you. If your dog jumps up when you come in, pulls on the lead, won’t come back when you call, barks non-stop when it sees something (and so many other everyday problems), it is trying to tell you something. When you know what it is, and more importantly you can show your dog that it can trust you, then it will relax and give up the bad behaviour that is spoiling your relationship. A dog will ask you questions is 4 vital areas – 1.Food. 2.Going for a walk (on and off the lead). 3.Potential dangers (barking). 4.Everyday status (especially when re-uniting). If you can answer these questions in a way your dog understands, you will have a dog that trusts you and will do what you say, and be with you when you want, and you can have the relationship that you both deserve. So, in short, Dog Listening is about understanding and successfully letting your dog know how you want it to behave IN A WAY IT ACTUALLY UNDERSTANDS. The best news of all is that it is simple, needs no force or gadgets, needs very little time and fits right into your normal day. Properly used, Dog Listening will change your life for the better – and that of your dog too of course. Can We Help You? Find out about the ways I can help you by clicking on this link Dog Listener Training Or visit www.janfennellthedoglistener.com for info on courses, and other dog training programmes. Tell her that her son suggested you did…
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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yasni 2011-02-04  +  

Amichien Bonding California

23 Nov 2008 ... Dog Listener Louise Pay. Positive Dog Training CA Amichien Bonding USA. ... Dog Listener California Louise Pay San Francisco East Bay Area ...
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webring.com 2011-02-04  +  

Dog Training & Behavior Advice/Help/Jan Fennell Dog Listener ...

Dog Listener San Francisco Bay Area Louise Pay 925-487-9386. A non ...
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ebdoglistener.com 2011-02-04  +  

Invalid URL: Small Business Directory | MSN Business Directory

Dog Listener San Francisco Bay Area Louise Pay,Dog Behavior Consultant CA. ... Dog Listener Bay Area CA Louise Pay 925-487-9386 Trained By Jan Fennell The ...
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msnbusinessdirectory.com 2011-02-04  +  

WebRing: Science, Biology, Animals, Mammals, Dogs

Louise Pay Amichien Dog Training Bay Area CA. Trained by Jan Fennell & Tony Knight in ... Dog Listener California Louise Pay San Francisco East Bay Area ...
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dir.webring.com 2011-02-04  +  

Links, Rescue Groups for Dogs, Puppy Raising-Guide Dogs For ...

www.furyfriends.org 1/18/11, www.everychancerescue.co.uk, Rottie Angels Rescue Bay Area CA. ... Louise Pay East Bay Dog Listener Cell: +1.925.487.9386. ...
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ebdoglistener.com 2011-02-04  +  

Amichien Bonding California

Changing dogs lives, by educating dog owners & canine caregivers, about a gentle training method called Amichien Bonding. ... Louise Pay Amichien Dog Training Bay Area CA. ...
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webring.com 2011-02-04  +  

Dog Training The Kind Way. Dog Listener Bay Area CA. | San ...

A Dog Listener, trained by Jan Fennell. Helping dogs in The San Francisco Bay Area. A gentle method to change ... Dog Listener Louise Pay San Francisco Bay Area, Trained by Jan ...
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bayarea.ebayclassifieds.com 2011-02-04  +  

The Puppy Listener Louise..Dog Listener CA..Trained by Jan Fennell The Dog Listener.San Francisco East Bay Puppy Trainer.Puppy Training..Puppy Classes..Puppy behavior..Puppies. Amichien for Puppies..Bringing up a puppy with Amichien Bonding..The East Bay

Puppy Listener Louise gentle puppy training.Guide your puppy using the dog listeners method.Amichien Puppy Training San Francisco Bay.In home puppy training helping you to shape your young dogs behavior from the beginning. Please read The Puppy Listener by Jan Fennell.In home help/advice about your puppy call Louise 925-487-9386 Amichien puppy training,The East Bay Dog Listener Louise Pay Simply Kind Dog Training.Puppy is.Puppy does.Puppy CA. Bay Area Puppy Trainer..Walking your puppy..
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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puppylistener.net 2011-01-21  +  

Please read, The dog Listener By Jan Fennell

By reading this book you may never need a dog trainer/behaviorist. Go to your local library and borrow a copy! Louise Pay The Dog Listener Bay Area CA
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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yasni 2010-11-19  +  

The Dog Listener San Francisco Bay Area Louise Pay,Dog Behavior Consultant CA.East Bay Dog Listener...Dog Training. Puppy training..Jan Fennell The Dog Listener CA..Gentle dog training in your home..Dog Listener Northern CA..Amichien Bonding..Dog Behavior

Dog Listener San Francisco Bay Area Louise Pay 925-487-9386 Trained By Jan Fennell The Dog Listener Willing Cooperation From Your Friend And life Time Support for you.Dog Training Any Age,Behavior,Breed.San Francisco East Bay Dog Training.Dog Behavior Training The Naturally Kind Way Amichien Bonding A Non Confrontational Way Of Changing Your Dog's Behavior.Dog Behavior Consultant Take The Lead In a Gentle Way.Puppy trainer Bay Area. Jan Fennell CA Understand your dog and change the behavior. Puppy Listener in the San Francisco Bay Area, based in the East Bay CA. Helping you guide your puppy and supporting you as your puppy grows. gentle in home help/training and a life time of advice. Dog Listener Louise Pay.
Louise Pay @  San Francisco Bay Area CA
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ebdoglistener.com 2010-11-01  +  

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